As we learned in my last post, colon cancer affects the colon, bowel, and rectum. It is the most common and most curable type of cancer (if caught early), and high iron intake (often derived by red meat) is a major contributor to the risk of colon cancer. Aside from iron, Vitamin D has been found to play a role in risks associated with colon cancer development.
A study conducted by the Veterans Affairs medical centers gave 3,000 people vitamin D and monitored them; the study showed that individuals who took higher levels of vitamin D had a lower risk of developing colon cancer.

How does vitamin D work in preventing colon cancer?
Vitamin D works by blocking the growth of cancer tumors. The active form of vitamin D, the calcitrol, does all the blocking work. Calcitrol is derived from the liver and in several organs of the body that may be affected with colon cancer.

Vitamin D acts on the cells by binding to the Vitamin D Receptor (VDR); a regulator of gene transcription that is found inside the nucleus. The VDR binds with the retinoid-X receptor, which results to the activation of the expression of specific genes.

One of the many types of genes regulated by vitamin D are those that produce a protein called calbindin and TPRV6, both of which are involved in the absorption of calcium by intestinal cells. Another gene regulated by vitamin D is CYP3A4. The protein from this gene detoxifies the bile acid lithocholic acid (LCA). LCA is believed to damage the DNA of the intestinal cells and promotes colon carcinogenesis. Vitamin D’s protective mechanism against colon cancer is through stimulating the production of detoxifying enzymes.

Benefits of vitamin D
As we learned in my last post, colon cancer affects the colon, bowel, and rectum. It is the most common and most curable type of cancer (if caught early), and high iron intake (often derived by red meat) is a major contributor to the risk of colon cancer. Aside from iron, Vitamin D has been found to play a role in risks associated with colon cancer development.

Studies examining the link between Vitamin D reveal that colon cancer rates drop rapidly as vitamin D levels rise above 5-10 ng/mL (12-25 nmol/L), then more slowly until levels of 40 ng/mL (100 nmol/L) are reached. This tells us that lower levels of Vitamin D may contribute to the development of colorectal cancer.

A study conducted by the Veterans Affairs medical centers gave 3,000 people vitamin D and monitored them; the study showed that individuals who took higher levels of vitamin D had a lower risk of developing colon cancer.

How does vitamin D work in preventing colon cancer?

Vitamin D works by blocking the growth of cancer tumors. The active form of vitamin D, the calcitrol, does all the blocking work. Calcitrol is derived from the liver and in several organs of the body that may be affected with colon cancer.

Vitamin D acts on the cells by binding to the Vitamin D Receptor (VDR); a regulator of gene transcription that is found inside the nucleus. The VDR binds with the retinoid-X receptor, which results to the activation of the expression of specific genes.

One of the many types of genes regulated by vitamin D are those that produce a protein called calbindin and TPRV6, both of which are involved in the absorption of calcium by intestinal cells. Another gene regulated by vitamin D is CYP3A4. The protein from this gene detoxifies the bile acid lithocholic acid (LCA). LCA is believed to damage the DNA of the intestinal cells and promotes colon carcinogenesis. Vitamin D’s protective mechanism against colon cancer is through stimulating the production of detoxifying enzymes.

Benefits of vitamin D:

  1. Keeps the surface layers of the organs intact
  2. Prevents cancer development